Why I Fuckin’ Love GLEE

Can you hear it?

That’s the sound of every single one of my man-o-sphere readers unsubscribing simultaneously. Well, fuck it. Glee is a great show, and it delivers a message that millennial men desperately need to hear.

 

So why is watching Glee taboo for manly men? Why is it that most of my friends laugh and crack jokes when I tell them I watch it? Well, the show is about a bunch of singing, prancing, dancing weenies in a loser-filled high school choir.  Not only that, some of the producers are dicks and every episode is a shmaltzy fable about the power of friendship, diversity, and following your dreams. Yes, glee is just as super-duper gay as you thought, if not more so.

But the central premise of Glee depends on overturning a deeply ingrained cultural assumption: Men who sing and dance are uncool and unmanly. In the show, a bunch of football players and cheerleaders join the glee club, and find that they actually love it. The cultural agenda of the show’s creators is clear: Singing and dancing are cool. Young men should sing and dance.

It’s possible to view this message (originally delivered by the story of Oz in American Pie) as yet another front on pop culture’s campaign against manliness. Maybe this was even the subconscious intention of the show’s creators. If it was though, they scored an own-goal. The idea that the fine arts – music, dancing, theatre, poetry, visual arts, photography – are inherently feminine is peculiar to the late 20th century. Throughout the history of western civilization, men were expected and encouraged to practice and excel at the arts.

Singing is MANLY. Painting is MANLY. Composing, writing, sculpting, and ballet dancing are all MANLY. The act of taking a chance and putting yourself out there for others to see what you’ve got is inherently courageous. Calling those who do fags while sitting on your ass is not.

In the past half-century, the veneration and respect given to (straight) men in the fine arts has dried up. We’ve been raised to believe that real young men feed their drive to excel in athletics, and nowhere else. Intelligence and artistic ability are tolerated, at best, in the modern high-school male.

Glee is changing that, by offering young men a set of artistically-inclined role models. I say fuck yeah to that.

 

So swallow your tough-guy mindset and go watch a few episodes.

Better yet, turn off the computer, put down the Playstation controller, and go chase whatever artistic passion you never pursued because society told you it wasn’t manly enough.